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Background of Australian Kurds

Kurds from Turkey began arriving in Australia in the 1960s, Kurds from Syria came from the late 1970s, and Kurds from Iraq and Iran in the early 1990s. Kurds have also come from Armenia, Georgia and Lebanon. In 2006, the number of people who identified as a Kurd in Australia was 5,500. Most live in Melbourne and Sydney.

Kurds from Turkey began arriving in Australia in the 1960s, Kurds from Syria came from the late 1970s, and Kurds from Iraq and Iran in the early 1990s. Kurds have also come from Armenia, Georgia and Lebanon. In 2006, the number of people who identified as a Kurd in Australia was 5,500. Most live in Melbourne and Sydney.

 

KLA Objectives

Kurdish Lobby Australia is a not-for-profit incorporated association established to engage with individuals and groups in and outside Australia, including parliamentarians, academics, business people, media, communities, government and non government organisations, to:

  • Promote a greater understanding of the political, economic and social circumstances of the people of Iran, Iraq, Syria and Turkey, with a particular focus on the Kurdish regions;
  • Disseminate information and advocate for human rights, dialogue and informed democratic, legal and economic practices in these countries;
  • Identify areas of need and facilitate the provision of direct material aid and investment for people impacted by war and other forms of oppression, discrimination and marginalisation in the Kurdish regions;
  • Promote reconciliation, mutual respect and tolerance between Kurdish Australians and other ethnic and religious groups in Australia;
  • Encourage the international community to speak out and take action in support of inclusive, transparent and informed democratic processes in Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey;
  • Advance the security and safety of Australia, Australians and the people of Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey, where Australians have served in a military capacity since World War I.

To fulfil these objectives KLA aims to:

  • Attract male and female members of diverse ages and backgrounds who are committed to the stated objectives of the organisation;
  • Be non-partisan in our goals, strategies, policies and public presentations; and
  • Base our decisions and activities on a process of consultation, transparency and a majority vote.

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